Category Archives: greenhouse gases

Is regenerative agriculture the real deal

Regenerative agriculture is in vogue as a concept but what does it really mean? I often get asked my opinion about regenerative agriculture.  My standard rejoinder is to ask what does the questioner mean by ‘regenerative agriculture’? That typically gets … Continue reading

Posted in Agribusiness, Dairy, greenhouse gases, Land and water, Water | 18 Comments

Carbon neutrality requires permanent forests not production forests

In recent months I have been writing about land-use transformation that will be driven increasingly by carbon trading. If New Zealand is to approach net-zero carbon, then it can only be achieved by a combination of modified lifestyles plus new … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, greenhouse gases, Meat Industry | 18 Comments

Government is losing the forestry debate with rural New Zealand

The response of Government Ministers to rural concerns about forestry policy is polarising the debate. Describing rural perspectives as ‘fiction’, and upset rural protesters as ‘rednecks’, is counter-productive. The combination of the Zero Carbon Act and forthcoming Emission Trading Scheme … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, greenhouse gases, Meat Industry | 38 Comments

Carbon farming has hidden consequences

New Zealand’s Zero Carbon Bill is based on the assumption that carbon farming through forestry provides a climate-change solution, at least until the arrival of new technologies that allow New Zealand to move away from fossil fuels. In contrast, Environment … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, greenhouse gases, Land and water | 30 Comments

Why methane is different

This is the second of a series of articles discussing some of the difficult issues that have to be understood and resolved in relation to New Zealand’s proposed Zero Carbon Bill. The first article is here  For many years, we … Continue reading

Posted in Agribusiness, greenhouse gases, Science ethics and communication | 5 Comments