Category Archives: sheep and beef farms

Carbon farming is back in the melting pot

There is considerable evidence that the Government plans to change the carbon-farming rules and to do so in the coming months. The big risk is that unintended consequences will dominate over intended consequences. Forestry Minister Stuart Nash has made it … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized | 19 Comments

Agriculture’s greenhouse gas proposals need a reset

  Refocusing agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions from CO2e to a genuine split-gas approach requires a reset of thinking, with big decisions ahead The coming weeks are crucial in sorting out the long-term charging framework, right through to 2050, for agriculture’s … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, Dairy, greenhouse gases, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized | 12 Comments

Crunch times ahead for agricultural methane and nitrous oxide

New Zealand must quickly come to grips with how agricultural-sourced methane and nitrous oxide are going to be managed within the ‘Zero Carbon Act’, more formally called the ‘Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019’.   This Act brings both … Continue reading

Posted in Dairy, greenhouse gases, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

The ETS is both a goldmine and a minefield

The Government never foresaw the land-use forces they were unleashing with the ETS In recent weeks I have written multiple articles on the Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) with a particular focus on forestry. This week I also had an extended … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, greenhouse gases, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized | 17 Comments

Carbon farming will determine the future of sheep, beef and production forestry

The carbon price is now high enough to change land-use sufficiently to blow away sheep and beef, but too low to significantly influence emission behaviours elsewhere The concept of ‘carbon farming’ has been around for a long time. I recall … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized | 11 Comments

Carbon farming steps forward on the North Island hard-hill country

In recent months I have been analysing New Zealand sheep and beef farming to try and understand the changing scene. Here, I shift the focus to carbon farming on the North Island hard-hill country where sheep and beef currently predominate. … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized | 7 Comments

The big picture with sheep

The sheep-farming retreat will continue despite excellent meat prices, with carbon farming the mega-force. In recent months, I have written four articles focusing on the sheep and beef industries across New Zealand. My main focus has been to identify the … Continue reading

Posted in carbon farming, forestry, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized, Wool | 5 Comments

Sheep remain dominant on South Island hill and high country

In previous articles, I first described the North Island’s 4000 commercial hill-country farms (Beef+Lamb Classes 3 and 4). Subsequently, I wrote about the approximately 4400 intensive sheep and beef farms that are spread across both North and South Islands (Beef+Lamb … Continue reading

Posted in Agribusiness, sheep and beef farms, The High Country, Uncategorized, Wool | Leave a comment

Intensive sheep and beef provide cash but wealth depends on capital gain

Intensive sheep farms have been squeezed by dairy and are now drifting to beef with wool right out of the money  This is the third article in a series investigating New Zealand’s pastoral sheep and beef farms. The first one … Continue reading

Posted in Meat Industry, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized, Wool | 2 Comments

Searching for the future on the North Island hills

Some weeks back I wrote an article on New Zealand’s sheep and beef farms, focusing on the current situation. I said I would be back as there was more to discuss about both the present and the future. Here, I … Continue reading

Posted in Agribusiness, carbon farming, forestry, Meat Industry, sheep and beef farms, Uncategorized | 2 Comments